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dedication 



O, while the rivers run 
To mingle with the sea, while shadows pass 
Along yon rounded hills from vale to vale, 
And while from heaven's unextinguished fire 
The stars be fed — so long thy glorious name, 
Thy place illustrious and thy virtue's praise, 
Abide undimmed. 

Vergil 






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MYRBETH E. WELDON 
Editor 



ARTHUR SOARES 
Art Manager 



FERNAND D. TALBOT 
Literary Editor 

PAUL F. CREAMER 
Photography 

DANIEL A. LIMA 
Assistant Editor 



alethea 
staff 




GEORGE E. PLANTE 
Business Manager 





.•■■ ■ s s ■■.■.- 




a message from 

the president 



There is always a bit of sadness in the writing of 
a foreword for the Institute yearbook. It stems from 
the realization that you students whom I have known 
so well for four years are about to become alumni. 
This means, of course, that you will not be seen 
around our corridors as often as before. I am sure 
that you all know that you will be most welcome 
whenever you care to visit us. The Institute stands 
ready to help you in the future in every way possible. 
It is a matter of considerable satisfaction to all on 
the staff and to me personally that again we are 
graduating a group we can really feel proud of. 

In these critical days the whole world needs 
thoughtful men and women as never before; men 
who are continually seeking a true understanding 
of both people and conditions. To smugly say, with 
a certain degree of false pride, that one is tolerant 
of men, races and creeds is merely to evade a 
responsibility. I know you will not seek to evade 
yours. You will seek to take your places as builders 
m our American way of life. I wish for you every 
success wherever you may be. 

LESLIE B. COOMBS 
President 





V 



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FRANK H. DILLON 

Professor of Engineering, 
head of department 

B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 



THEODORE P. MEAD 
Instructor in Art, acting head 

department 
B.F.A. Pratt Institute 
M.A. Columbia University 



of 



JOHN G. STICKLER 
Associate Professor of Textile Design 

head of department 
Formerly, Head Designer, Esmond 
Mills 






DR. JAMES WATTERS 

Professor of Chemistry, head of de- 
partment 
B.S. Howard College 
M.S. University of Cincinnati 
D.Sc. University of Cincinnati 



RUDOPH L. LaVAULT 

Associate Professor of Social Sciences 
Ed.B. Rhode Island College of Edu- 
cation 
Ed.M. Rhode Island College of Edu- 
cation 



JOHN WILLIAM NORMAN 
Associate Professor of Weaving 






HAROLD C. SMITH 

Associate Professor of Yarn Prepara- 
tion 

Massachusetts Institute of Techno- 
logy, Lawrence Scientific School 



WALTER E. MARSTON 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Diploma: Chemistry, Bradford Dur- 
fee Technical Institute 



ALBERT A. STEWART 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 
M.A. Boston University 





X 



DR. SAMUEL A. STONE 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. University of New Hampshire 
M.S. University of New Hampshire 
Ph.D. Boston University 



WILLIAM H. WINGATE 
Assistant Professor of Dyeing and 

Finishing 
Diploma: Textile Chemistry, Lowell 

Textile Institute 






FREDERICK WINTER 
Assistant Professor of English 
A.B. Clark University 
M.A. University of New Hampshire 



WALTER J. CASS 
Instructor in Literature and 

Languages 
A.B. Northeastern University 
A.M. Boston University 



ROBERT E. COOPER 
Instructor in Physical Testing and 

Quality Control 
Diploma: Cotton Manufacturing, 
Bradford Durfee Technical Insti- 
tute 





JOHN JAMES CRAWFORD 
Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 
Superintendent of Maintenance 



JOHN W. FERGUSON 

Instructor in Yarn Preparation 
Formerly Technical Field Agent, 
Whitin Machine Works 



JOHN GREENHALGH 

Instructor in Textile Styling 
Diploma: Designing Bradford Dur- 
fee Technical Institute 






BERTRAM BENCE HARDY 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
Sc. B.E.E. Brown University 
R.P.E. Massachusetts 



HOWARD B. LEIGHTON 
Instructor in Art 
B.S. University of Cincinnati 
B.S. in Ed. Miami University 
Diploma: Palais de Fontainebleau, 
France, M.A. Columbia University 



LOUIS S. J. SIMEONE 

Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S.— Northeastern University 
A.M.— Boston University 






CLAUDE WILLIAM WAGNER 
Instructor in Chemistry 
B.S. University of Cincinnati 
M.S. University of Cincinnati 



EUGENE ROBIE WILLIAMS 

Instructor in Engineering 

B.S. Ch.E. — Northeastern University 



MARGARET E. MORGAN 
Accountant and Treasurer 






JACQUELINE P. AXE 
Senior Bookkeeper 



LORRAINE A. BERUBE 
Junior Clerk — Stenographer 



DENISE M. HARBECK 
Junior Clerk — Stenographer 



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chemistry 




Keeping pace with the rapid advancements 
in practical and theoretical chemistry is a re- 
cognized essential in the development of the 
men and women suited for this swiftly evolv- 
ing field. At Bradford Durfee Technical Insti- 
tute, it is in the laboratories and lecture rooms 
that this task is met and equalled. 

The major courses include physical, organ- 
ic, and analytical chemistry. Supplementary 
instruction is required in such subjects as math- 
ematics, physics, scientific German, and liber- 
al arts. Altogether, the student graduating is 
thus given a sound foundation which will 
enable him to cope with the problems of the 
field. 



ii 



'V 




The past few years have witnessed 
the advance of electricity until it has 
become a prime factor in the modern 
way of life. With this idea in mind, the 
Electrical Engineering Division strives 
to furnish the student with a thorough 
training in the fundamental principles 
of power and electronics. 

In order to do this effectively, theo- 
ry is combined with ample laboratory 
exercises. In this way, the student has 
the opportunity to put into practice 
what he has learned in the classroom 
and to obtain a working knowledge 
that can be applied practically in the 
years of employment ahead. 







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From out of the laboratories and lectuj^^^nik have come the in- 
formation and techniques that will be appfied in industrial dyeing and 
I textile chemistry. Our graduates are not only equipped with extensive 
knowledge of chemistry, but are well versed in the field of textiles as 
related to chemistry. Finally the theoretical aspects are well rounded by 
'^practical experience in the dye laboratories and the mill. The graduate, 
therefore, is well suited for problems which are encountered in the textile 
Id. V , 




textile 
engineering 




Originally a textile school, Bradford Durfee Tech- 
nical Institute has incorporated many years of ex- 
perience, experiment, and industrial cooperation into 
an outstanding course in Textile Engineering. Not 
only students and faculty, but the community as well, 
are deservedly proud of this accomplishment. Aca- 
demic recognition of the success and merit of the 
course was achieved two years ago, with bestowal 
of the degree of Bachelor of Science on those who 
complete the four-year course. 

Equipped with the degree and thorough knowledge 
of his subject the graduate has his choice of taking 
a responsible^ place in industry, or of continuing his 
studies in one of the graduate schools. 




mechanical 
engineering 



Machines are man's creation, and yet in a sense 
the man of today is a machine product, for modern 
civilization owes its material and in a large measure 
its esthetic development to machinery. It may be 
taken almost as axiomatic that, at least for engin- 
eering purposes, no theory or equation is of value 
until it is put in a form that can be readily under- 
stood and utilized. It is the aim of the staff of the 
mechanical engineering option to present the funda- 
mental principles and to guide the student progres- 
sively from the simpler applications to the more 
complex cases. He will learn how to approach his 
tasks; that is, he will discover that any device or 
problem, however complicated, can be resolved into 
groups of the elementary combinations and studied 
as such. The particular form in which this knowledge 
should be absorbed and the extent to which it 
should be interpreted obviously will depend upon 
the individual. 






Textile design and styling in its practical applica- 
tion, has attained a first-rank importance in interior 
decoration, in fashion, and in the theater. As a 
means of contributing to the completeness of decor in 
the smart modern interiors of contemporary life, tex- 
tiles are being utilized extensively. Fabrics, much im- 
proved, and design— inspired from every source imag- 
inable, from the ancient, primitive sculptures of Afri- 
ca to the modern elements and sleek lines of our 
own Machine Age — have been made available to 
more people than ever before. Thus, largely through 
modern textile styling, we have become texture cons- 
cious. 

In his role of textile stylist, the expert serves, thus, 
a vital need. Indeed, through the channels of the 
esthetic, he is responsible in large part for the guid- 
ance and molding of public taste. He knows the com- 
oonents of a good textile design; his knowledge of 
Datterns, color, line, form, and area relationships is 
l^ell grounded. The four-year program in this field 
at the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute trains the 
student thoroughly: He gains the basic understanding 
o become a textile stylist and he also acquires the 
echnical know-how of the actual weaving and fabri- 
:ation of the textile itself. He is fitted for his im- 
Dortant responsibility in life. 



textile 
styling 




advertising 
design 




In this materialistic age there is a need to instill within 
each individual the fusion of modern artistic trends in the 
practical and evolutional theory of living. $*^ 

It is for the artist of today to impregnate into the culture 
of the masses the spirit of modern design. In our lifetime we 
have witnessed amazing advancements in the sciences though 
many people still think in antiquated terms. 

We all must amend the vocabulary of our language of 
vision if we are to meet the requirements of our dynamic age. 



advisers 



It is with a somewhat apprehensive feeling that I 
watch you, the present Senior Class, approach gradua- 
tion. Somehow I feel that I also should be graduating 
since my freshman year as an instructor coincided with 
your freshman year. My reflections on this topic, how- 
ever, are only momentary; and as I consider the many 
friendships formed during the first year and continued 
in succeeding years, I find the past to have a rather 
enjoyable flavor. 

Your studies here at the Institute have required you 
to consider a wide variety of knowledge and ideas in 
the fields of art, technology, and the humanities. Each 
individual acquired a certain amount of knowledge. Each 
student also expressed, to a varying degree, a desire 
to peruse, ponder, and ping-pong some of the ideas 
presented to him by members of the faculty. These then 
are the activities in which you have been engaged and 
which, if they are as purposefully pursued in the future 
as they have been in the past, will enable you to become 
not mere automatons, but rather individuals having the 
ability to shape your own lives and to bring your goals 
closer to fruition in the post-Tech years. 

C. WM. WAGNER 



Being an adviser to you during your entire four years 
at Bradford Durfee Technical Institute has been not 
only a responsibility, but a pleasure rarely extended 
to an individual. 

The bond between us is strong. As your efforts cul- 
minate in the achieving of the cherished degree, a not- 
able milestone has been reached; the pride that you 
deservedly feel, I, too, sense. 

Using to best advantage the college education that 
you have acquired, I am confident of your continued 
success in industry or profession and in the art of liv- 
ing. The knowledge you have gained — and more that 
you will absorb — will help you to see clearly; the 
tempering influence of mature minds of your professors 
and authors of texts will enable you to exercise good 
judgment; imagination, fostered through the spirit of 
investigation of abstruse problems, will prompt you to 
enlarge your mental horizons and undertake new steps 
of progress; inherent faith, built from many trials in un- 
dergraduate endeavor, will sustain you when the road 
is rough. Armed with these attributes of your four-year 
training — knowledge, judgment, imagination, faith — 
you will be a credit to yourself, to your adviser, to 
your college, and to your country. 

FREDERICK WINTER 




HviiC; ■■■■ 




Forrest V. Heckman, Jr Treasurer 

Mario Antonelli Vice President 



James Curtis President 

Raymond Carrier Secretary 



senior class 



At the corner of Bank and Durfee Streets in Fall River on 
the austere building standing stalwart and impressive since 
1893, is a challenging sign — Bradford Durfee Technical In- 
stitute. As freshmen, we were confronted with this challenge and 
seventy-one of us accepted it. Now after four years of study, 
work, laughs — and gripes — we take our exit. The transforma- 
tion from "green" freshmen to mature seniors is truly re- 
markable. 

Even now, vivid in our minds is that first morning of our 
undergraduate careers when we sat starry-eyed with anticipation 
in the auditorium listening eagerly to President Coombs as he 
acquainted us with the rules and regulations of the College. As 
we poured out of the auditorium, fervently clutching our newly 
acquired Student Handbook, many upper classmen stood by, 
volunteering "tongue-in-cheek" information. This was our begin- 
ning. 

The constitution of our group was primarily war veterans, 
who hailed Bradford Durfee Technical Institute as a place of 
opportunity. The mature approach of the veterans' segment and 
their general propensity for candid discussion has proved sti- 
mulating. At times, however, their "superannuated" air sobered 
activities to perhaps needess conservatism. Others of our group, 
as well as veterans, were pronouncedly serious, being charged 
with the responsibility of raising a family or working long hours 
to defray expenses incurred in attending college. 

Along with the intellectual growth of experience in our 
quest for knowledge we have been fortunate to witness the 
rapid physical development of the college and we have had 
our share of enjoyment of the many moments, incidents, and 
events peculiar to institutions of higher learning. 

Some highlights follow. In our freshman year, we saw the 
resumption of publishing the student yearbook; it was called 
the Pioneer. We also witnessed the first girl cheer leaders, who 
added much color to the basketball games. And at graduation 



time, the Institute, having been granted the right to awari 
degrees, we saw the lordly seniors for the first time dressee 
in cap and gowns. 

The biggest events of our sophomore year were the charter- 
ing of Kappa Sigma Phi Sorority and the initiation of work 
on the proposed Student Council. 

During our junior year, the new Student Council, being now 
set up in its final form, was voted upon favorably by the stu- 
dent body and legally accepted. Also two new clubs were 
born in this year: The Glee Club, and The Beaux Arts Club. 

As we entered our senior year, we had the privilege of 
being the first class to use the new wing of the college, which 
has been named the Leslie B. Coombs Science Hall. The firs 
intercollegiate stag dance, held in November, under the au* 
pices of Kappa Sigma Phi Sorority, was a huge success; by 
invitation, neighboring schools of nursing and colleges particip- 
ated. Thereafter, a number of other dances have been offered 
in the new cafeteria salon. 

Among the faculty, three changes occurred: Dr. D. Alexander 
Severino head of the Department of Art and Product Develop- 
ment left to teach at the University of Wisconsin; Mr. Leroy 
Smith, an instructor of the same department, took a new position 
in Vermont; and Mr. Harold C. Smith, associate professor in the 
Department of Textile Engineering, retired. 

At this writing, the exciting climax is yet to come — inter- 
views for positions, examinations, the senior prom, dinner dances, 
and banquets — and lastly, graduation day. 

We have come a long way in four years. We have learnec 
principles of life as well as book knowledge. We have made 
our future inviting. We have become soft-spoken, confident 
truly adult individuals. 

In some fitful indulgence of reminiscing, this college an 
nual and particularly the kaleidoscopic summary of this account 
will serve as a spring board to relive these fruitful years. 




seniors 



bachelor of science 







MARIO ANTONELLI, JR. 

Mechanical Eng. 

Soccer 1, 2; Fencing 3, 4; Varsity 1, 2, 3, 4, vice 
president 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Dean's List 
3; Engineering Society; Senior Vice President. 



DONALD BENOIT 

Advertising Design 

Fencing 2, 3, 4; Phi Psi 2, 3, 4; Beaux Arts Club 
3, 4. 




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A. ROBERT BERNSTEIN 
Textile Eng. 
Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ALFRED K. BONGE 
Textile Eng. 



20 




RAYMOND R. CARRIER 
Textile Eng. 
Senior Class Secretary. 




PAUL F. CREAMER 
Electrical Eng. 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Alethea 4. 




JAMES F. CURTIS 

Textile Eng. 

Senior Class President; Baseball 1, 2, 4; Phi Psi 
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ADRIAN FORCIER 

Electrical Eng. 

Engineering Society; Sophomore Class President. 



21 







JAMES E. GREICHEN 
Electrical Eng. 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Fencing 4. 



JOHN J. GREICHEN 

Electrical Eng. 

Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Engineering So- 
ciety, President 4; Fencing 4. 








EDWARD A. GROTA 

Civil Eng. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4; Engineering Society 1, 2, 
3, 4. 




WILLIAM H. HAMPL 
Electrical Eng. 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 



22 






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HAROLD J. HODKINSON 

Mechanical Eng. 

Baseball 1, 2; Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Ath- 
letic Club 2, 3, 4. 




LUIS M. KAWAS 

Textile Eng. 

Phi Psi 2, 3, 4; Cosmopolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 4. 




1 




THOMAS F. KENNEY, JR. 
Advertising Design 
Alethea 1, 2, 3, 4; Beaux Arts Club 3, 4. 



23 



ROBERT S. KENYON 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Basketball 1, 2; Soccer 2, 3; Tennis 2; Varsity 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Phi Psi 2, 3, 4, Vice 
President 4; Distaff 2; Bowling League 3, 4, 
President 4; AATCC, President 4; Athletic and 
Social Union, Vice President 3, President 4. 




NORMAND F. LAFOND 
Chemistry 




Baseball 2, 3. 



PETER F. LAJOIE 
Civil Eng. 
Phi Psi 3, 4; Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 




PAUL A. LAMOUREUX 
Chemistry and Dyeing 
AATCC 3, 4; A.C.S. 3, 4. 







THOMAS LAWTON 

Textile Styling 

Glee Club 3; Distaff 4; Phi Psi 2, 3, 4; Cosmo- 
politan Club 3, 4; Beaux Arts Club 3, 4; Alethea 
4. 



24 




DANIEL A. LIMA 

Chemistry 

Distaff 1, 4; AATCC 1; A.C.S. 1; Epsilon Phi Pi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Scribe 3, Chancellor 4; Cosmopolitan 
Club 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Alethea 4, assistant 
editor; Junior Class Treasurer. 



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EDWARD W. MAKUCH 
Chemistry and Dyeing 
Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; AATCC 3, 4. 




JAMES W. MARCHAND 
Civil Eng. 
Tennis 2, 3, 4. 




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25 



JOSEPH H. MURPHY, JR. 

Chemistry 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Fenc- 
ing 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; A.C.S. 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Distaff 4; Athletic and Social Union Secretary- 
Treasurer 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Cosmopolitan 
Club 2, 3, 4; Student Council 4. 




JOHN G. MURRAY, III 

Electrical Eng. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Fencing 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- 
Captain 2; Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Distaff 
1,2. 




it. 



HERBERT T. PALMER, JR. 
Electrical Eng. 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 





GEORGE E. PLANTE 

Civil Eng. 

Alethea 4, Business Manager; Tennis 2, 3, 4; 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling League 
4; Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4. 



BERNARD PORITZ 
Textile Eng. 



Fencing 2, 3, 4. 



26 




DAVID A. ROY 
Textile Eng. 




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JOAN T. SEIFERT 

Textile Styling 

Kappa Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Vice Presi- 
dent 4. 




ARTHUR SOARES 

Advertising Design 

Junior Class President; Beaux Arts Club 3, 4, 
President 4; Baseball; Alethea 2, 3, 4, Art Man- 
ager 4. 





DANA C. SUMNER 

Civil Eng. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4, Scribe 4; Basketball 2, 3; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; 
Dean's List 2. 



27 





FERNAND D. TALBOT 

Electrical Eng. 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 
4; Student Council 4; Alethea 4, Literary Editor. 



ARTHUR J. TURNER 
Mechanical Eng. 
Fencing 3; Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 





KENNETH C. VORCE 
Textile Eng. 




28 



MYRBETH E. WELDON 

Textile Styling 

Alethea 4, Editor; Distaff 3, 4, Assistant Editor; 
Student Council 3, Secretary; Glee Club 3, Vice 
President 3; Kappa Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice 
President 2, Vice President-Secretary 3, President 
4; Beaux Arts Club 3, 4; Bowling League 3, 4; 
Cheerleader 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 4; Junior Class 
Vice President. 




VICTOR J. WOJCIK 
Textile Eng. 




Baseball 1, 2. 



DONALD WALLWORK 

Textile Eng. 

Sophomore Class Treasurer; Junior Class Sec- 
retary; Student Council 4; Athletic and Social 
Union, Treasurer 4. 




HAROLD HALL 
Textile Eng. 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4. 




JOHN E. Mc COOMB 
Textile Eng. 



29 



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junior class 

The class of '54 began its life at Bradford Durfee Technical Institute in September, 
1950. The first week was one filled with the talcing of placement examinations and 
getting acquainted with our advisers and our fellow students. Overcoming the usual 
confusion of schedules, classes, and rooms, we soon settled down to the routine of 
college life. 

With the end of the first-semester examinations, we had passed the half-way 
mark, and by now we were completely oriented in our new academic world. Elections 
were held and the Greek letter societies pledged their new members. Having hit our 
stride, we worked so hard and efficiently, the remainder of the year seemed to simply 
fly by. May came, and our final examinations. There was then the respite of summer 
vacation to anticipate. 

Our sophomore year found us with a large decrease in the number who showed 
up for registration. This year, specialization began, with the division of students into 
the major departments of their choice. The grind again started — this time much more 
stringent. We were no longer the "green freshmen" but had assumed the significant 
and confident role of sophomores. Examinations continued unendingly, but we took 
all challenges. Elections came in order, and soon the Christmas vacation blessed us 
with a short "breather." We all managed to finish the year even though things looked 
discouragingly difficult al times. 

Junior year found us really established upperclassmen at last. We had lost only 
a few members, and the rest of us began the year with poise and assurance. Some of 
this was jolted by mid-semester, but our grades showed that we had not worked in 
vain. The rest of the year is continuing methodically and now the bigger part is 
concluded. 

We now look forward to our final year which we hope will bring to us the degree 
we so earnestly have worked to achieve. 

Class officers are: President, Dorothy Zebrasky; Vice President, John Birkett; Secre- 
William Marsden; Treasurer, Stanley Sieczkov 



sophomore class 

Entering the doors of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute in 1951, many of us 
were dubious as to the mark which we would leave on the college and the mark it 
might well leave on us. Inevitably, we settled into a routine with as many groans and 
grumbles permissible and looked forward to a prosperous or disastrous year. 

We made it — at least part of the original group made it — but as is natural, 
some decided to cancel their reservation — or had them cancelled for them — and 
left the train bound for Progress Unlimited. 

We began the year of 1952 with a seriousness and resoluteness which probably 
was not expected of us, but was prominently shown. Class elections presented us with 
the following as officers: President, Janet Gault; Vice President, Lawrence Hathaway; 
Secretary, Raymond Comtois; Treasurer, Edward Mello. Thus the year was legally 
christened. 

Even though our functional activities as a body were seldom exercised, everyone 
enjoyed himself to the fullest as one of the class unit. We have learned in this past 
year to expect the fruits of effort and occasionally to mourn the fruitlessness of lazi- 
ness. Durfee Tech has taught us some very important lessons in these two years, and 
we have yet two years in which to learn countless more. Let us look forward to a 
rich harvest. 



freshman class 



On September 15, 1952, the Freshman Class, consisting of nine girls and eighty- 
one boys, entered the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute for the first time to begin 
their four-year programs in the fields of art, chemistry, engineering, or textiles. 

Most of the students came from Fall River and surrounding towns, but there was 
representation from neighboring states and even far-off countries such as Burma, 
Afghanistan, and Puerto Rico. Getting acquainted was made easier through college 
dances sponsored by upperclassmen and by group parties held by the "frosh" them- 
selves. 

Election day placed the following class officers in charge: President, Alan Freeman; 
Vice President, Robert Sinotte; Secretary, Carol Robinson; Treasurer, Leonel Pavao. 

In athletics, the new students soon made their presence felt as participants in 
soccer, basketball, fencing, and bowling; and coming seasonal sports, such as baseball 
and tennis, will find the freshman recruits vying with upperclassmen for berths on 
the varsity teams. 

The spirit of the college has been greatly increased by the addition of a new 
cheering squad composed of six freshman girls whose colorful performances have 
enlivened athletic contests. In a sense, their enthusiasm is a symbol of the determination 
of all the members of the Freshman Class to take the initiative in carrying out their 
various objectives. N 

An auspicious beginning has been made. 




student 



activities 



phi psi fraternity 





Originating with a group of five students at Philadelphia College of Textile 
Engineering in 1903, Phi Psi has grown into the largest textile fraternity in the world. 
It was incorporated in 1905 in Pennsylvania and now includes nine active chapters. 
The aims of the organization are two-fold: to enhance development of the textile 
art and its application in industry; and to promote good will and professional advance- 
ment of member. The late Harold Hart, one of the founders, deserves special credit for 
extending his guiding hand in achieving these goals. 

Delta Chapter of the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute, whose charter was 
granted in 1909, carries on the national tradition. At present there are twenty-two 
student members working together. The biggest cooperative venture this year has been 
the acquiring of a new fraternity house which serves as a center for business meetings 
and for social gatherings in the form of smokers, dances, and informal chats. The gen- 
eral aim of the local chapter is to be active in the community. The degree meeting 
of new pledges in Boston and regional conventions are as usual being anticipated. 

In the passing of one of its brothers, Delta Chapter was saddened this year. 
Cadet John Kneen of the Air Force was killed in a plane crash last summer. 

OFFICERS 

President Joseph H. Murphy Secretary Richard Peckham 

Vice-President Robert S. Kenyon Treasurer Paul V. Parente 

Faculty Adviser Prof. William H. Wingate 



34 



distaff 




The Distaff, long established student publication of the Bradford Durfee Technical 
Institute, attracts personnel of sharp mind, adventurous spirit and hard-working 
capacity. Each month, each week, each day there is something new, something to be 
remembered. A corps of reporters is always on the job. Details must be gathered; 
deadlines must be met; proofs must be checked; pages must be set up for the press — 
and then another issue is on its way to fellow classmates, alumni and others who 
subscribe. The students who arrange the Distaff recognize the value and experience 
the participation affords. 

THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Thomas McCloskey Reporters Gil Wallace, Beverly Singleton 

Assistant Editor Myrbeth Weldon Dorothy Zebrasky, Thomas Lawton 

Business Manager Harold Isserlis Robert Sinotte, Daniel Lima 

Circulation Manager Donald Taylor Elizabeth Shaw, Barney Poritz 

Sports Editor Donald Taylor Donald Wallwork 

Art Manager Carolyn Brownell Faculty Adviser Prof. Rudolph Lavault 




35 



epsilon phi pi 




In five years' time, based on the sound principles of freedom, friendship, and 
fidelity, and in a spirit of complete tolerance, Epsilon Phi Pi has enjoyed great progress. 

From the chartering of this professional fraternity in April of 1948 by the State 
of Massachusetts, the membership has increased from twenty to a present roster of over 
one hundred members, including an actively interested alumni. 

With the establishment of the Beta Chapter in the Philadelphia Textile Institute, 
our Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity has received a most deserved acceptance as a fraternity, 
not merely social, but one of truly professional breadth. 

An even brighter future looms. 

OFFICERS 

Chancellor Daniel Lima Treasurer Lawrence J. Lacerte 

Vice Chancellor Harold Isserlis Secretary Lawrence Hathaway 

Pledgemaster John Rogers, Jr. Historian Frank La Bounty 

Corresponding Scribe Dana Sumner 







J v i 



kappa sigma phi 




The Gamma Chapter of the Kappa Sigma Phi Sorority was chartered in May, 
1950, here at Bradford Durfee Technical Institute. Although the membership of the 
sorority since its origin, has necessarily been limited, it has become increasingly active 
over the past four years. 

This last year, the sorority, having its largest membership, has been able to 
sponsor many social affairs. Among these were a tea held for all non-sorority girls; a 
very successful "poverty" dance; an informal dance in the school cafeteria; and an 
off-campus dance at the White Rail in Warren, Rhode Island. The sorority also sent 
two representatives to the formal initiation exercises at New Bedford Textile Institute. 

The sorority strives to unite women of like interests and ambitions in the textile 
field in order to foster their common desire for the exchange of knowledge and en- 
couragement of fine ideals and sincerity. 



OFFICERS 



President Myrbeth Weldon 

Vice-President, Treasurer Joan Seifert 



Secretary Dorothy Zebrasky 

Social Chairman Carolyn Brownell 



37 



varsity club 



During the past year, the Varsity Club has accomplished much. It has fulfilled its 
primary obligation: to encourage student participation in athletics, either as a member 
of any of the teams or as a spectator — in either case, the affiliation evoking real pride. 
Also, in keeping with tradition, the Varsity Club has awarded to its newer members 
above freshman standing the coveted Durfee sports sweaters. This gesture was made 
possible by funds raised through a college dance and through contributions of club 
members. Membership in the Varsity Club is restricted to students who have won 
letters in one or more of the major sports in college: soccer, basketball, and baseball. 



OFFICERS 



President Robert Kenyon 

Vice-President Stanley Sieczkowski 



Secretary-Treas James Curtis 

Faculty Adviser Prof. William H. Wingate 




38 




a* d* !•€•€• 



The American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists is a national organiza- 
tion whose objectives are: to promote increase of knowledge in the application of 
dyes and chemicals in the textile industry; to encourage practical research in chemical 
processes and materials of importance to textile manufacturing; and to establish for 
the members, channels through which the interchange of professional knowledge 
among them may be expanded. 

The student chapter at Bradford Durfee Technical Institute, organized on April 12, 
1948, under the direction of Professor Wingate, assisted by Mr. Paul Dargie, an en- 
thusiastic student, has brought to the college all the advantages of the parent society. 
Locally, the work of the chapter is fruitful; it provides literature on the latest develop- 
ments in textiles; it teaches leadership and cooperation; it affords the advantage of 
lectures by industrial experts on topics which help the student in his college work and 
also guide him in planning his future career — practical information which is not 
generally obtainable in text books. 



OFFICERS 



Chairman Robert Kertyon 

Secretary Edward W. Makuch 



Treasurer Gil Dias 

Faculty Adviser Prof. William H. Wingate 



39 



amencan 



chemical society 



Since its inception in New York City in April, 1876, by a small group of chemists, 
the American Chemical Society has become the world's largest organization devoted to 
a single science. Its aims are high: to encourage in the broadest and most liberal 
manner the advancement of chemistry in all its branches. 

In September, 1949, the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute Student Chapter of 
the American Chemical Society was organized. This action represented a great stride 
forward, with continuing benefits accruing to each student affiliate as follows: he 
receives journals and periodicals published by the Society; he gains the privilege of 
attending national, regional, divisional, and local meetings of the parent organiza- 
tion; he may avail himself of the services of the A.C.S. Employment Clearing House, 
an agency which has been very helpful in aiding students to locate positions after 
graduation; and he gains experience in preparing technical material and in pre- 
senting his findings before audiences and chemically trained people. Starting with 
thirteen charter members, the Durfee Student Chapter has this year a roster of 
twelve students. Activities have included lectures and movies presented by members 
and outstanding men in industry. 



OFFICERS 

Chairman Joseph H. Murphy 

Vice-Chairman William Fletcher 

Secretary-Treas Dorothy Zebrasky 

Faculty Adviser Dr. James Watters 





engineering 



society 




Now in its fifth year, the Engineering Society shows great promise of becoming 
outstanding in view of the rapidly increasing enrollment of engineering students. It is 
through the activities of this group that members are shown the solutions of engineering 
and related problems of modern industry. Lectures by prominent men in the field, and 
moving pictures on practical topics provide the principal means. In addition, the friendly 
discussions which are engendered at each monthly meeting, do much to promote 
brotherhood and harmony among the members. 

Thus, the stipulated aims of the society are realized: to anticipate and solve stu- 
dent engineering problems and to aid in the advancement of engineering; and in so 
doing, to develop the student's initiative, to encourage research and advance study, 
and to extend an atmosphere of fellowship among classmates studying similar courses. 



OFFICERS 

President John J. Greichen 

Vice-President John R. Rogers 

Secretary-Treas. Jeffrey F. O'Brien 

Faculty Adviser Prof. Frank H. Dillon 







I 





student 
council 



The Student Council was organized in 1952 as a regulatory body of the entire 
student body. Its purpose is to provide the students with an organization to which they 
can bring any problems they may have while at college. The Council functions under 
a constitution which was approved by the student body and which can be changed 
only by a majority vote of it. President Coombs, as the faculty adviser, reviews any 
issue that is voted on by the Council. 

This body affords the college a representative form of government which allows 
individuals to initiate new ideas for submission to the proper authorities for consideration. 

The Council is made up of the presidents of each of the four classes, a representa- 
tive from each department of the school, and a representative-at-large. 



42 



OFFICERS 



Senior Class President James Curtis 

Junior Class President Dorothy Zebrasky 

Sophomore Class President Janet Gault 

Freshman Class President Alan Freeman 

Textile Dept. Rep. Louis Kawas 



Engineering Dept. Rep. Fernand D. Talbot 

Chemistry Dept. Rep Joseph H. Murphy 

Art and Product Development Rep John Birkett 

Representative-at-Large Donald Wallwork 

Faculty Adviser Mr. Walter J. Cass 




cosmopolitan 



In 1946, a group of foreign and native students at Bradford Durfee Technical In- 
stitute joined hands to form the well-named Cosmopolitan Club. To maintain its specific 
nature, membership is limited to the proportion of one half foreigners and one half 
citizens of the United States. In regard to membership sought by the latter, priority 
is given to those students knowing a foreign language. This year's total roster numbers 
twenty. 

The avowed purpose of the club is to establish warm friendships between students 
coming from different countries of the world and to stimulate in these students, ideals 
of intellectual achievement and social development. The club is non-sectarian and non- 
partisan. Socially, good-fellowship and understanding reach a climax in monthly 
dinner meetings at restaurants featuring national dishes of the members. 

Countries represented this year are India, Honduras, Portugal, Republic of South 
Africa, and the United States. 



OFFICERS 

President .,.. Barney Poritz Secretary-Treasurer Daniel Lima 



Faculty Adviser Mr. Louis Simeone 



43 






beaux arts 
club 





An innovation at Bradford Durfee Technical Institute is the Beaux Arts Club, 
established in 1952, which unites all students of art — regardless of their option — 
in achieving worthwhile objectives in the field. Through meetings and trips to various 
art centers, the group seeks to gain a better understanding of art in the past and a 
knowledge of the part it plays in the community today. 

A social program comes to its climax each year in the Beaux Arts Ball. This event 
is rapidly rivaling in importance the year's highlight, the senior prom. 



OFFICERS 

President Arthur Soares Faculty Advisers 

Vice-President, Treasurer Joseph Rapoza 

Secretary Carolyn Brownell 



Mr. Theodore Mead 

Mr. Howard B. Leighton 
Mr. John Greenhalgh 



44 




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directory 



NAME 

Antonelli, Mario, Jr. 
Benoit, Donald 
Bernheim, Philippe 
Bernstein, A. Robert 
Bonge, Alfred K. 
Carrier, Raymond R. 
Cholewa, Stanley P. 
Creamer, Paul F. 
Curtis, James F. 
Forcier, Adrian G. 
Franco, Arthur C. 
Greichen, James E. N 
Greichen, John J. 
Grota, Edward A. 
Hall, Harold L. 
Hampl, William H. 
Hodkinson, Harold J., Jr. 
Heckman, Forrest V., Jr. 
Kawas, Luis M. 
Kenney, Thomas F., Jr. 
Kenyon, Robert S. 
Lafond, Normand F. 
Lajoie, Peter L. 
Lamoureux, Paul A. 
Lawton, Thomas 
Lima, Daniel A. 
Makuch, Edward W. 
Marchand, James W. 
McCoomb, John E. 
Murphy, Joseph H., Jr. 
Murray, John G. 
Palmer, Herbert T., Jr. 
Plante, George E. 
Poritz, Barney 
Roy, David A. 
Seifert, Joan T. 
Soares, Arthur 
Sumner, Dana C. 
Talbot, Fernand D. 
Turner, Arthur J. 
Vorce, Kenneth C. 
Wallwork, Donald T. 
Weldon, Myrbeth E. 
Wojcik, Victor J. 



ADDRESS 

51 Last Street 

5 Bryant Street 

2 rue de Frene 

496 West McKinley Avenue 

341 Thayer Street 

1 1 Maple Street 

20 Evans Avenue 

17 Shawmut Street 

34-A Pleasant View 

65 Massasoit Street 

2560 Riverside Avenue 

15 Gilroy Street 

15 Gilroy Street 

33 Randolph Avenue 

679 Charles Street 

38 Wilcox Street 

38 Mystic Street 
149 Middle Street 
Main Street 

496 Ocean Grove Avenue 
23 Ash Street 
51 Suffolk Street 
15 Beverly Street 
1319 North Main Street 
15 Beach Avenue 
282 Somerset Avenue 
83 Lowell Street 

39 Palmer Street 
127 Winter Street 
31 Hanover Street 
141 Barlow Street 
634 Yale Avenue 
148 Barnes Street 
302 Doherty Street 
44 Whittier Road 
25 Albion Street 
204 Sherman Road 
56 Evans Avenue 
216 Jefferson Street 
36 Bulkley Street 
247 Sunset Hill 

153 Ray Street 

Water Street 

465 Washington Street 



CITY & STATE 

Fall River, Massachusetts 
N. Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Mulhouse (Haut Rhin), France 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 
Providence, Rhode Island 
Taunton, Massachusetts 
Tiverton, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Somerset, Massachusetts 
Newport, Rhode Island 
Newport, Rhode Island 
Tiverton, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Tela, Honduras, Cen. America 
Swansea, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Swansea, Massachusetts 
Taunton, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Somerset, Massachusetts 
Tiverton, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Assonet, Massachusetts 
West Warwick, Rhode Island 



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PATRONS 



A. G. Forcier 

FernandD. Talbot 

Mrs. Anna Gauthier 

Miss Pauline Talbot 

Miss Blanche Fluet 

Diss Dora Fluet 

Mr. Octave Fluet 

Mr. & Mrs. Ovide Talbot 

Miss Anna Connerton 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland Bernard 

Miss Regina Fluet 

Mr. James Nicoletti 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Sousa 

Mr. & Mrs. Laurence Poulin 

John A. Sousa 

Mr. & Mrs. George Migneault 

Robert Migneault 

Mr. & Mrs. George Lortie 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Levesque 

Frank A. Carfagno 

Mrs. Sadie M. Seifert, R.N. 

Mr. & Mrs. P. Polselli 

Mr. & Mrs. A. C. Bonge 

Miss Ethel Brindle 

Miss Cindy Gay 

Mrs. John McConville 

Miss Madelin Curtis 

Charles F. Curtis 

Charles E. Curtis 



Mrs. William Roy 

Mrs. Henry J. Viens 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Turner 

Mr. & Mrs. Victor Wojcik 

Mr. & Mrs. Victor Wojcik, Jr. 

Miss Stasia Wojcik 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Hodkinson, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Hodkinson, Sr. 

A Friend 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael P. Hopkins 

John J. Greichen 

Maureen C. Shea 

Mrs. Rosamond M. Greichen 

Mr. & Mrs. T. Zajac and Son 

James E. Greichen 

Miss Patricia Kelly 

Mr. Henry E. Madden 

Mrs. Henry E. Madden 

Mr. James P. Madden 

Mrs. James P. Madden 

Mr. John Murphy 

Mrs. John Murphy 

Mr. William Benisch 

Barnes Street Cash Market 

Bshara's Restaurant 

Barnabe Jewelers 

P. Levesque & Son Market 

Jimmy's Hot Dog Stand 

Ed's Health Aid 



Carroll Cut Rate 
Flint Center Market 
City Resale Mart 
Lafayette Shoe Store — 
J. S. Eisenberg, Prop. 
Lussier Bros. 

Mr. & Mrs. Alcide Desmarais 
Romie's Radio & T.V. Service 
Forand's Market 
Mrs. Henry J. Duffy 
Alec's Radio & Television 
Mr. & Mrs. L. Salois 
Ideal Package Store 
Peerless Laundry 
George's Market 
Miss Marie Morissette 
Kook-E-Land 
Paul's Flower Shop 
Charlmor Furniture 
Style Shop 
Pleasant Drug 
Mr. Alcide W. Berube 
J. E. Amiot Sons Co. 
Chagnon's Photo Service 
Mr. & Mrs. A. Garand 
Charron Furniture 
Dashoff Mills 
Paul O. Barre, O.D. 
Mr. Robert F. Lagasse 



§ 



When 



you want a photograph... 
you want a fine photograph 

and that's the only kind your official photographer takes! 



Photograph Studio 



4th Floor 






66 



9 9 




X£ > '**^^^<-^^^ l ^^'-^<-^<-^K^^<«^i^'^™*^'i^'-^^ 



67 




What a wonderful world of color 
was locked in that magic tube! 



Shimmering jewels, a brilliant mosaic — what pictures could be imagined in the 
tiny wonderland of a kaleidoscope! But careful! Don't 
jolt it! ... Or you'll find that your wonderland has gone. 

Every color that danced in that miracle tube has been captured 

by dye scientists for everything that people wear or people use. 

But these need not be kaleidoscopic colors that change — or unstable colors 

that fade; they can be colors that last for the entire lifetime of the material. 

That's the kind of color fastness that can be 
yours when you turn to Du Pont for dyes. 
Our technical service experts will help 
you find the righl dye for the end use — 
whatever it may be. E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
& Co. (Inc.), Dyes and Chemicals Division, 
Wilmington 98, Delaware. 




R IG U S PAT Off 



Better Things for Better Living 

. . . through Chemistry 



For unbroken continuity 
of service . . . 



-J 

§ 




JOHNSON WARP SIZERS 

are known and used by efficient mills throughout the world. 
They are good for long years of continuous, trouble-free sizing of delicate 
warps, with few broken ends and an absolute minimum of mechanical 
adjustments or parts replacements. 

The Ultimate in Sizer Design 






CHARLES B. JOHNSON 

PIERCY & HOLSMAN STREETS 
PATERSON NEW JERSEY 

New England Representative 
J. S. FALLOW & COMPANY, New Bedford 









t 



69 




VATROLITE®— Use this powerful concen- 
trated reducing agent for brighter vat dyed 
colors on cotton, linen and rayon . . . for fas- 
ter, cleaner stripping results on silk, cotton 
and rayon. 

DISCOLITE®— A concentrated reducing 
agent, highly stable at high temperatures, 
outstanding for discharge and vat color 
printing. Employed successfully wherever the 
reducing agent must dry into the fabric and 
retain its reducing power. 



PAROLITE®-A dust-free white crystalline 
reducing agent. Soluble, colorless, excellent 
for stripping wool, wool rags, shoddy acetate 
or Nylon fabric. 



NEOZYME®- Concentrated low tempera- 
ture desizing enzyme. Removes starch and 
gelatine. Excellent for eliminating thickeners 
from printed goods at low temperatures. 



FOR 
TEXTILES 




NEOZYME® HT-Concentrated high tem- 
perature desizing enzyme. Removes both 
starch and gelatine. Suitable for continuous 
pad-steam method. Remarkable stability at 
very high temperatures. 



NEOZYME® L & NEOZYME ® L Cone. 

—Liquid desizing enzymes in two degrees of 
concentration. Remarkable stability at very 
high temperatures. 



CASTROLITE ®-A highly sulphonated cas- 
tor oil used as a staple penetrant for dyeing 
or bleaching in leading textile mills. 



VELVO SOFTENERS #25 & #50- 
Economical creamy white paste softeners de- 
rived from highly sulphonated tallows. Give 
softness and body without stiffness or affect- 
ing whites. 



DRYTEX®-A high-test wax emulsion type 
water repellent finish having extreme stabil- 
ity both in the barrel and in diluted form 
as used. Non-foaming. 



NEOWET^-Permits effective wetting at all 
temperatures— particularly useful with enzy- 
matic desizing agents. No reaction to soft or 
hard water. Not affected by either acid or 
alkali chemicals. Non-ionic. 




®< 



CHEMICAL COMPANY • CARLTON HILL, NEW JERSEY 

Manufacturers of Chemicals for the Textile Industry 



§ t 

§ f 



■rcO 




It's a better than even chance.. 



. . . that you who have special preparatory training 
will become the textile executives of tomorrow . . . 
and because of this, Stowe-Woodward has a genuine 
interest in you who are graduating. 

Long before you reach the position that goes with 
that big mahogany desk and its inviting swivel 
chair, you will have learned a good deal about 
Stowe-Woodward Rubber Covered Rolls and their 
importance in the textile industry. 

When you've arrived , you will also know that Stowe- 
Woodward is a pretty dependable source of help 
on any textile problem involving the use of rubber 
covered rolls. By then, we'll know you, too. 

Right now, we'd like to extend congratulations for 
a good start and our best wishes for your success. 



§ 






c rubber covered rolls 



STOWE-WOODWARD, inc. 



NEWTON UPPER FALLS 64, MASS. 



¥,&^<^x^<4r>^^^ v ^^,^^>^^^^^v^^<^^<*^.^<^r''^^-^<^^'-^~C/^ 



71 



I L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY | 

"Known wherever there are Schools and Colleges" i 

ATTLEBORO MASSACHUSETTS § 

& Class Rings and Pins & 

y Commencement Invitations — Diplomas y 

§ § 

& Personal Cards & 

y Club Insignia — Medals and Trophies y 



§ 



§ 



& Represented by ' & 

f TOM GALVIN | 

? Attleboro Office ? 



Compliments of 

ABBOTT MACHINE CO., INC. 

WILTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Southern Office: Greenville, S. C. 

Manufacturers of Textile Machinery 









72 



FALL RIVER HERALD NEWS 



^ 

* 



Wherever BETA OXY NAPHTHOIC 
ACID and NAPHTHOLS are used 
the name "PFISTER" has become 
synonymous with top quality. 



$ 




MANUFACTURED BY 




Pfister ( h- egncal Works 



RIDGEFIELD 



NEW JERSEY 



Compliments of 

McWHIRR'S 



FALL RIVER'S LARGEST DEPT. STORE 



ify&V&*&*4^*-0^&™&^<^*&K^<^V*&V*^%^U&V^^<&V^~K&% 



73 



§ THE FUNCTION OF THE § 

UNITED STATES TESTING COMPANY § 



in the 
TEXTILE INDUSTRY 



Compliments of 

EDWARD M. CORBETT, Architect 

49 PURCHASE STREET 
and 

SAMUEL T. DUBITSKY, Architect 

41 NORTH MAIN STREET 






To screen raw materials before they undergo processing. 

To establish quality control over goods in the manufacturing process. 

To evaluate materials before they are adopted for general use. § 

To rate finished goods for construction and serviceability. £ 

To aid in merchandising by Certifying goods worthy of Certification and awarding ^ 

them the Seal of Quality. § 

To solve technical problems of an unusual nature whether the solution involves a £ 

simple laboratory test or a complete field research. ? 

To establish testing standards where none exist and to design and manufacture new § 

testing equipment where the need for these is indicated. & 

To settle disputes . . . arbitrate disagreements . . . adjudicate conflicting claims on £ 

a basis of impartial, scientific findings. y 

To set up measurable standards of serviceability in the various functions of textiles & 

as a guide for the industry and as a measuring rod for comparisons. ? 

To assist those who are developing new products . . . working on new processes ... y 

seeking new uses and applications for old products. & 

To apply the techniques and methods developed in other industries to the advancement ? 

of the textile industry and the solution of its problems. y 

To shed light upon every branch of textile manufacture through scientific investigation & 

and to share this light with those who wish to see better. r 

UNITED STATES TESTING COMPANY, INC. | 

(Established 1880) | 

HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY | 

Boston — Chicago — New York — Philadelphia — Denver — Providence £ 

Los Angeles — Memphis — Dallas £ 

Member of American Council of Commercial Laboratories & 



X<^<-^-<5 > ^^'^'-(5 > v^^t<^.^>-K^i^,^T<^<^>v.^<^<^^^ 



74 



Compliments of 



J. & J. CORRUGATED BOX CORP. 

FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



I 

* 
* 




PRODUCERS OF 

FINE COMBED COTTONS 

FOR WEARING APPAREL 

AND HOME FURNISHINGS 



BROADCLOTHS 
DIMITIE5 
LAWN5 



ORGANDIES 
VOILES 

FINE SPINNING ASSOCIATES INC. 



HANDKERCHIEFS 

MAR^UISETTE.5 
DOTTED AND PLAlM 



Turks Head Building, Providence, R. I. 



40 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. 



Compliments of 

SHERRY CORPORATION 

823 DA VOL STREET 
FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS § 



75 



§ Good Luck and Success § 



TO THE CLASS OF '53 



INTERNATIONAL 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



ST. ANNE'S SCHOOL OF NURSING 






| LADIES GARMENT WORKERS UNION f 

§ f 

§ ; § 

I f 

§ f 

S N f 

§ Compliments of 9 

! ' 

FALL RIVER TEXTILE MANUFACTURING f 

ASSOCIATION | 



X^'<^'-^-^'-^-«5^^^>v.*5>^^ l 4 : 5^.^(^t^%^ 



76 



I* 



lOv0*&*&*&v<0™<0n*0*0™&^^Cr> 




dsL ow 



368 South Main Street, 



Progress . . . 

Product of Experience 



You found it true during your years of training at Bradford Durfee Tech- 
nical Institute. You'll find it even more evident as you progress in your career 
in the textile field. 

Progress . . . achievement . . . grow in proportion to your experience, your 
continuous opportunity to apply your knowledge and talents to everyday doings! 

The axiom applies equally to companies as to individuals. Such famous dye- 
stuff products as the Solophenyls, Cuprophenyls, Erio Chromes, the revolutionary, 
new Irgalans and, of course Mitin durable mothproofing were developed as the 
result of nearly a century of Geigy research in the textile field. 

As your own career progresses, you will find it helpful to rely on names 
like Geigy . . . names which represent progress through experience! 



GEIGY COMPANY, INC. 

89 Barclay St., New York 8, N. Y. 




Dytstug MaJtm Sine* 1859 



§ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 



77 






§ 



1 

— * 



Compliments of 

SUSSMAN'S SURPLUS STORE 

274 SPRING STREET 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



THE CASABLANCA 



CURTIS and MARBLE 
MACHINE CO. 

BUILDERS OF < 

Preparing, Blending and Picking Machines, 
Cloth Room Machinery for cotton, rayons, etc. 

Finishing Machinery for woolens and wor- 
steds, carpets, felts, corduroys and pile fabrics. 

Write for our new, fully illustrated Catalog 
of Cotton Machinery No. 7-51 and Catalog of 
Woolen Machinery No. 12-51. 

Main Office and Plant: 

72 Cambridge St., Worcester, Mass. 

Southern Office: 

1000 Woodside Bldg., Greenville, S. C. 



CHINA ROYAL 

The Most Modern American and Chinese 
Restaurant in the City 

— Air Conditioned — 

26 NORTH MAIN STREET 

Fall River, Massachusetts 

Telephone 4-2310 




HAVE YOU SEEN THEM? $ 

. . . Watson-Williams' newest additions — & 

shuttles for Draper Looms, fitted with Cast £ 

Iron Eyes, to accommodate a longer filling ? 

package. Top — 15!4" long. Bottom — 15 3 /£" $ 

long. ^ 

Watson-Williams Mfg. Co. I 

MILLBURY, MASSACHUSETTS § 

Northern Representative: & 

Guy C. Burbank, 32 Beaconsfield Rd. \ 

Worcester 2, Mass. 



MASON FURNITURE 
SHOWROOMS 

Plymouth Ave. and Rodman St. 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

Open from nine to nine 



i^cr-'^^^^c^'-c^--^-^^<^^^c r, 'C^-c^'^c r --o^'-c r ' , ^c^-c^<-^ 



78 



Compliments of 



DURFEE BOWLING ALLEYS 



Compliments of 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING 
COMPANY 

OF 
FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

1244Davol Street 



F. H. KINGSLEY CO. 

Construction Materials — Paint 

687 Davol Street 
Fall River and New Bedford 



Compliments of 



R. A. WILCOX COMPANY 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



j 

§ OF § 

§ % 

j Compliments of ^^^^^^ j 




"Verybest" Loom Necessities 

The Bullard Clark Co. 



E. H. Jacobs Sou. Div. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



E. H. Jacobs Nor. Div. 
Danielson, Conn. 



MADE RITE 
POTATO CHIP CO. 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Massachusetts 






X£*x*^x-tf>^^ 



§ 



79 






5 






O'NEIL'S FISK TIRE 
SERVICE, INC. 

276 CENTRAL STREET 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 

Riveredge Printers, Inc. 

TEXTILE SCREEN PRINTING 

Plant: 

206 Globe Mills Avenue 

Fall River, Mass. Tel. 3-5886 

New York Office : 
1450 BROADWAY 
New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone BRyant 9-7710 



J. O. NEILL SUPPLY CO. 



Best of Luck to 
CLASS OF '53 

STEVENSON'S 

Between Fall River and New Bedford 



General Hardware and Builder's Supplies 
MILL SUPPLIES 

Wholesale and Retail 

130 Bedford Street Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 6-8237 



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PLYMOUTH PRINTING | 
COMPANY I 



90 POCASSET STREET 
FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



MARK YOU 

American and Chinese Restaurant 
Delicious Cantonese Style Food 

1236 Pleasant Street 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



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Compliments of 

BUILDING MATERIALS INC. 

139 FRONT STREET 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

Tel. 9-6191 — Evenings By Appointment 

ROBERT'S 

FULL DRESS RENTAL SERVICE 

398 Spring Street Fall River, Mass. 

(Opp. St. Mary's Cathedral) 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



HARBOR TERRACE 
RESTAURANT 

where 

B. D. T. I. People 

Meet to Eat 

PETER GALLO, Prop. 



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Compliments of 

FLINT CARD & GIFT SHOP 

1457 Pleasant Street 

RELIGIOUS ARTICLES POPULAR and CLASSICAL MUSIC 
FRENCH and ENGLISH CARDS for all OCCASIONS 



Norman E. Levesque, Prop. 
Dial 3-1971 



Organist at Notre Dame Church 
Fall River, Mass. 



Best Wishes to Tech's Grads 


Compliments of 


PETROSSO BARBER SHOP 






ANDERSON & CLAYTON 


272 CENTRAL STREET 




FALL RIVER 


COTTON BROKERS 


ARTHUR A. PLANTE & SON 


FALL RIVER GLASS CO., INC. 


Diamond Setters — Watch Repairing 


296 Spring Street Fall River, Mass. 


Academy Building — Tel. 3-0561 — Suite 221 


Showroom — 412 Second Street 



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Compliments of 

REGAL FLOOR COVERING INC. 

152 North Main Street Fall River, Mass. 



Congratulations to the 
1953 GRADUATES 

EPSILON PHI PI FRATERNITY 



GRAY TYPEWRITER CO. 

Exclusive Royal Representation 
All Makes Sold, Rented, Repaired 

134 Second Street Fall River, Mass. 



BESSE-RUSSELL'S 

Men's and Boys' 
CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

221-223 South Main Street 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

JOSEPH NADEAU'S SONS 

RIGGERS — TRUCKERS 

CRANE SERVICE 

Telephone 2-6862 — 2-7662 — 2-4703 — 3-9053 
486 WARREN STREET FALL RIVER, MASS. 



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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 



MUNRO ELEC SUPPLY & 
HARDWARE CO. 

389 Second Street Fall River, Mass. 



PHI PSI FRATERNITY 

Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 



THE FRANK L. ALLEN 
LUMBER CO. 

285 Oliver Street Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 9-6443 



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Compliments of 

LEO H. BERUBE 

Speedwell Farms 
ICE CREAM 



J. N. GENDREAU 

Moving — Trucking — Rigging 

All goods insured while in transit 
folding chairs for hire 

158 17th Street Tel. 7-9712 



Compliments of 

MIKE'S RESTAURANT 



Compliments of 

R. G. CHOUINARD 
FUNERAL HOME 

943 County Street 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


D. DIXON DONOVAN INC. 


SMITH LUMBER CO. 


Plumbing and Heating 


30 President Avenue 
Fall River, Massachusetts 


NEWPORT, R. I. 






Tel. 5-7875 


JOHN E. COX CO., INC. 




Structural Steel and Ornamental Iron 


Compliments of 


Electric & Acetylene Welding 


SMITH DRUG 


753 Davol Street 




Fall River, Massachusetts 





Compliments of 

RAYMOND E. BUCKLEY 

Plumbing and Heating 

97 Ray Street Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 7-9760 



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Plants: Passaic, N. J. 

Carlstadt, N. J. 

Los Angeles, California 




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